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GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Note: You can use the Find Command in the Edit menu if you wish to find a particular word

BACK BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to revisit locations
 

BOOKMARKS MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

BROWSER

A software program for getting information from the World Wide Web.
 

CHAT

To communicate with a person, a group, or a site on the Internet in real time by typing on your keyboard. The words you type appear on the screen(s) of all the other participants in the "chat" and their typing appears on your screen
 

CLICK

To press and immediately release the mouse button. To "click on" something is to position the pointer directly over it and then click
 

CLIENT

A program that accessing and displaying information supplied by another program which usually runs on another computer on the internet. Netscape is a client program for accessing and displaying WWW pages
 

DESTINATIONS BUTTON

A button on the directory bar
 

DIRECTORY BAR

A row of buttons near the top of your document window which you can use to discover new and cool Web pages, search for certain topics, concepts and people, and download the latest software
 

DIRECTORY MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

DOWNLOAD

To copy a file from another computer to your computer. For instance, you might download the latest version of the Netscape browser from the Web
 

DRAG

To click down on something and then move the pointer while holding down the mouse button
 

EDIT MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

ELECTRONIC MAIL

A simple system designed to allow the sending and receiving of messages across a network
 

E-MAIL

Short for Electronic Mail
 

FAX MODEM

A type of modem that can send (and in most cases, receive) faxes in addition to transferring data files. Fax modems can't send printed documents unless they are first scanned and saved on your computer as disk files
 

FILE MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

FIND BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to search for specific text on the current page
 

FORWARD BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to revisit locations
 

FTP

A means of transferring files from one computer to another. FTP stands for File Transfer Protocol
 

GO MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

GOPHER

A method for organizing information on the Internet using a system of menus. Items in the menus can be links to other documents, searches, or links to other information services
 

HARDWARE

The parts of your computer system that you can bump into -- physical components such as hard disks, printers, modems, scanners, cards, keyboards, mice, and the Mac or PC itself
 

HOME BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which returns you to the home page
 

HOME PAGE

A Web page that you have designated as your home base. It is usually a a page about you or your organization. If you do not tell Netscape otherwise, it will assume that your home page is the Netscape home page
 

HOT SPOT

Another name for link
 

HTTP

This is a set of rules exchanging WWW documents between computers that hold the pages and computers that would like to see the pages. HTTP stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol and is the basic protocol for the World Wide Web
 

HYPERTEXT

A hypertext document is one that includes links (connections) to other documents. In concept this is similar to including footnotes in a printed document. However, in a hypertext document you can switch to the connected item by clicking on a "hot spot," usually indicated by a different color from the surrounding text. In the World Wide Web links can lead to other documents on the same data server, or might take you to other servers
 

IMAGES BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to load images
 

INTERNET

The Internet is a super-network. It connects many smaller networks together and allows all the computers to exchange information with each other. To accomplish this all the computers on the Internet have to use a common set of rules for communication. Those rules are called protocols, and the Internet uses a set of protocols called TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol). Many people equate the World Wide Web with the Internet. In fact, the Internet is like the highway, and the World Wide Web is like a truck that uses that highway to get from place to place
 

INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDER

A commercial service that sells access to the Internet to individuals. Usually you connect to your Internet service provider through a modem. Some providers only offer a basic connection to the Internet. Others sell a variety of "value added" services such as discussion forums, tech support, software libraries, news, weather reports, stock prices, plane reservations, even electronic shopping malls. Popular service providers include America Online, CompuServe, and Netcom
 

ISP

Short for Internet Service Provider
 

LINK

A word, picture, or other area of a Web page that users can click on to move to another spot in the document or to another document. Words and phrases that are links may be underlined and usually appear in a contrasting color text. The text and underline color may change after you click on the link so you can tell if you've already followed the link. Pictures that are links sometimes have a blue border around them which also may change colors after you click on them
 

LOCATION BOX

A box located near the top of the document window. Click in the white box to enter the Internet address (URL) of a web page you wish to visit
 

NAVIGATION

A slang term Netscape likes to use for browsing
 

NET

In general "Net" is a slang abbreviation for "The Internet." However, there are some private networks (members-only parts of Compuserve or America On Line, for example) that are not part of the Internet. Someone might say that they have information available "on the Net" even though it is not accessible through the Internet
 

NET SEARCH BUTTON

A button on the directory bar
 

NETWORK

In general, a group of computers set up to communicate with one another. Your network can be a small system that's physically connected by cables or you can connect separate networks together to form larger networks. The Internet, for example, is made up of thousands of individual networks
 

NEWSGROUPS

Readers post messages, or articles, to newsgroups for other people to read. They can also reply to articles that they read on a newsgroup. It's one way for people like yourself to communicate with millions of people around the world
 

OPEN BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to open a new location
 

OPTIONS MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

PEOPLE BUTTON

A button on the directory bar
 

POINTER

The little icon that moves on the screen when you move the mouse. Its most common shapes are the arrow and the I-beam
 

PRINT BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to print the current Web page
 

PROTOCOL

A set of standardized rules for exchanging information among computers. Different protocols are used for different kinds of communication. For example, the HyperText Transfer Protocol specifies the rules for communication between World Wide Web servers and browsers. File Transfer Protocol sets the rules for copying files from one computer to another across a network
 

PULL-DOWN
MENU BAR

A bar at the top of the document window which allows you to open, print, and save pages, set preferences, search for specific words or phrases, and much more
 

RELOAD BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to reload the current page
 

SCROLL

To move through the contents of an electronic document in order to see things not currently displayed. It is normally done by using a scroll bar
 

SCROLL BAR

The rectangular strip that appears on the right and/or bottom edges of a Web page when there's more information than is currently displayed. You can "click" on its gray area and/or use the scroll arrows and scroll box to move the Web page's contents
 

SEARCH ENGINE

A search engine allows you to find World Wide Web pages that contain specific words or phrases. Some popular search engines include http://www.google.com.au.au , http://www.altavista.com and http://www.excite.com
 

SERVER

A computer program that provides information or services (like e-mail or WWW documents) to programs like Netscape. Likewise, Netscape is a client program asking servers for these services
 

SNAIL MAIL

A slang term for the U.S. Postal Service. Nicknamed snail mail because the delivery time of a posted letter is slow when compared to the fast delivery of e-mail
 

SNEAKERNET

A file-sharing strategy that uses hand-carried diskettes. Transfer speed depends on the efficiency of your footwear
 

SOFTWARE

A file or files containing instructions that tell the computer what to do
 

SOFTWARE BUTTON

A button on the directory bar
 

STOP BUTTON

A button on the toolbar which allows you to stop a download process
 

SURFING

Slang for using a browser to move through the World Wide Web
 

TCP/IP

The rules used by computers to communicate via the Internet. TCP/IP stands for transmission control protocol/Internet protocol
 

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

The transfer of information between computers over telephone lines. Just plug in a modem, fire up some communications software, and you can make contact with the office computer or the Internet
 

TITLE BAR

The top portion of the browser's window that has in it the title of the current Web page being displayed
 

TOOLBAR

A row of buttons at the top of your browser's window which you can use to revisit pages, load images, open locations, print pages, find text, or stop transfers in progress
 

URL

A URL is the scheme for creating addresses for World Wide Web pages. A URL uniquely identifies a Web page. URLs have three parts: a protocol tag, a server name, and a directory path. Consider the URL http://wings.ucdavis.edu/SPIT/index.html. "http://" tells your browser that this is a hypertext server. "wings.ucdavis.edu" is the Internet's name for the server. "/SPIT/index.html" is the location of the file on the server
 

VIEW MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

WEB PAGE

A document on the World Wide Web. It is written in hypertext so it can contain text, pictures, movies, sounds, or links to other Web pages
 

WEB SITE

A colection of Web pages on the World Wide Web having to do with a particular topic or organization. K8AIT, for example, is a Web site
 

WHAT'S COOL BUTTON

A button on the directory bar
 

WHAT'S NEW BUTTON

A button on the directory bar
 

WINDOW MENU

An item on the Pull-Down Menu Bar
 

WORLD WIDE WEB

An interconnected set of hypertext documents located throughout the Internet. The documents are kept on computers called servers, which can send the documents to your computer. As of late 1996 the World Wide Web contains over 30,000,000 documents. It is also refered to as the WWW and sometimes just as "The Web"
 

WWW

The World Wide Web
 

WYSIWYG

Short for What You See Is What You Get -- that is, the image you see on screen matches what will print on paper. Pronounced "wizzy-wig."